Home / Reviews / ‘The Endigo Society’: A Look At The Supernatural [Review]

‘The Endigo Society’: A Look At The Supernatural [Review]

The Endigo Society

Review by Justin Dash

The Endigo Society, Endgio Society,Issue, Story
© Norwick Robinson

There are some spoilers to the story, so if you want to skip the review, now is your time to do so!

The Endigo Society is a new comic series by writer, Norwick Robinson, and artist Marielle Rodriguez and Joshua Rose. Having read the mini episodes all the way through, the Endigo Society was not an enjoyable read for me. I don’t know if I can say it’s a look at the supernatural, as I’m not sure what it’s about.

The Endigo Society, Endgio Society,Issue, Story
© Norwick Robinson

Honestly, I’m having a hard time finding more to say to elaborate on my point, but the first two issues – issue 0 being only eight pages, and issue 1 being seven – are so slim on content and information,  that I’m left with nearly nothing to go with. It might seem like I’m being unfairly harsh given that there’s clearly more story to come to fill in the gaps left by these first two issues, the fact that within only fifteen pages the author managed produce double the number of questions, does not get the story off to a good start.

The Endigo Society story presents an introductory page in each issue that’s supposed to lay the groundwork for the story to come. Apparently, there’s a legend surrounding a mysterious sage who possessed “the secret of the supernatural,” and already I am scratching my head. What does the author mean by “supernatural?” Do they mean ghosts, psychic phenomenon, the Loch Ness monster, or the theory of Atlantis? Is “supernatural” a codeword for something, in the same way, that “the force” was code for telepathy in the Star Wars franchise? This is never elaborated on in either issue of the comic.

Issue 0, introduces us to the protagonist, a girl named Odyssey. We also meet her brother Sabali and her grandfather, who must be some kind of martial arts master. They have breakfast, the kids go to school while discussing a newcomer to Odyssey’s class, and…well that’s it. Nothing else happens. Issue 1 opens and closes on an action sequence involving a different character that I can only assume is the newcomer mentioned in the previous issue, a boy named Diggs.

The Endigo Society, Endgio Society,Issue, Story
© Norwick Robinson

The school kids seem wary of him because he’s rich and has strange gemstones in his hands. And despite this being established just fine in the visuals and dialogue, the author felt the need to drill this point home with a completely unnecessary paragraph. Then a bully picks a fight with Diggs, Diggs easily defeats said bully, and that’s the end of the issue.

Issue 1 opens and closes on an action sequence involving a different character that I can only assume is the newcomer mentioned in the previous issue, a boy named Diggs. The school kids seem wary of him because he’s rich and has strange gemstones embedded in his hands. Now despite this being established just fine in the visuals and dialogue, but then a bully picks a fight with Diggs, Diggs easily defeats said bully, and that’s the end of the issue.

One of the positives I have for the Endigo Society is the artwork is solid, and clearly inspired by numerous popular manga. Unfortunately, the story lacks substance or a coherent story. It is heavy on the exposition,  and yet little is actually explained. I don’t know who anyone really is or what the nature of the world they inhabit is. And The reader may not know either.  I just can’t see the reader caring very much about what they see and read.

The Endigo Society, Endgio Society,Issue, Story
© Norwick Robinson

Perhaps in later issues more will be explained, and with time, the creator of the series will grow as a writer. It is for those reasons that I won’t completely write the comic off. But for now, given what I’ve read so far, I have to say that this book is a bit of a bore and off to a very slow start.

Perhaps in later issues more will explain in more detail, and with time, the creator of the series will grow as a writer. It is for those reasons that I won’t completely write the story off just yet. But for now, given what I’ve read so far, I have to say that this book is a bit of a bore and off to a very slow start.

If you want to find out more information on the Endigo Society, you can find writing Norwick Robinson on Twitter, or facebook at Polyglyphic Studios

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About Valerie Complex

Valerie Complex is a freelance writer, and professional nerd. As a lover of Japanese animation, and all things film, she is passionate about diversity across all entertainment mediums.

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